Conserving precious resources

As you know, California is in a  serious drought. Water conservation is on the mind of most of the citizens although I have been reading about some in southern California who are using millions of gallons of water on their estates. Guess there are a few who don’t want to be concerned with what will happen when there is no more water for growing the food for the world that we do so well here.

Because the city utility bill is in Terry’s name, and because he pays said bill, I rarely, if ever, look at the monthly invoice. Yesterday, after it arrived by mail, Terry was discussing our water usage for the month of October. He has occasionally mused on what we use and I listen with one ear, but yesterday’s stats made me sit up and take notice.

The average monthly use of water in a Fresno household was 18,637 gallons. Our address used 7,143 gallons. That is 2,052 gallons BELOW our drought allocation! I was stunned. Yes, I’ve cut back on watering the yards. Yes, we put in water restrictors in the toilets. Yes, we now have a low-flow kitchen faucet. But most days we run the dishwasher twice. We take showers every evening, albeit short ones. We are home, a lot, so we are using the facilities more than when we were away at work all day.

Terry and I know how important water is to this valley and its economy. There are communities where wells have dried up and there are homes with no running water. It makes me fearful at times. I read about the ground sinking due to all the pumping that is going on to water the large corporate vineyards, orchards, and dairies. These ag owners have the funds to drill $400,000 wells that go down over 100 feet, drawing up water that has been there for centuries. What happens when that water is gone?

We will keep conserving, doing our small part, with hopes that the snow will fall this year, replenishing surface water for agriculture irrigation.

Advertisements

9 responses to “Conserving precious resources

  1. Did I tell you that we take 2 minute showers at the Y. 🙂 We run the dishwasher once a day or less no matter what, and there are times the toilet gets flushed only occasionally. We have restrictors all over too. We hand water our few potted plants twice a week, and that’s just about it. Yet you make me feel as if I am sloughing off.

    • Does your city give you a total for the water you use? Or are you charged by the gallon? We are metered, but it’s a flat rate depending on the size of your lot. We only have a 6,000 sq ft lot. Most of our friends sit on 10k or larger lots.

  2. Wow, you really do your part, Delaine. Our rain has returned and I don’t think we are still in a drought, like you are in California. I’m hoping, same as you, that you’ll get rain and snow this winter from the El Nino, if nothing else.

  3. It is very scary. I do hope most of the people there are being as conscientious as you, but somehow I don’t think so.

  4. Good for you. Bishop Sheen used to say, if we all light one candle, what a bright world this would be. Too bad som many like the darkness.

    My DIL in San diego told me, for the first time, she is becoming fearful of drought. Why are some people such pigs? If they don’t shape up, they should be publically humiliated.

    PS I am amzed at how much water you two use and still manage to bathe and wash dishes.

  5. This water shortage thing is really scary. Can you imagine what those other people are doing if you’re using so much less? I know my sister-in-law in California is now redoing their front and back to put in more astroturf and bricks to replace lawn. They are also replacing plants with more desert hardy types.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s